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7/18/2016 - Link: Rosetta Stone for Unix
11/13/2015 - Librepup 6.0.2.2
3/19/2015 - systemd - probably a bad thing
2/25/2011 - Basic Tips for Using TrueCrypt in Puppy Crypt 4.3 (Tips)

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Link: Rosetta Stone for Unix
Monday, July 18th, 2016
04:22:16 GMT


This looks useful, even though I haven't used most of the operating systems mentioned on this page:

A Sysadmin's Unixersal Translator (ROSETTA STONE)
OR What do they call that in this world?

Usually I use Puppy Linux. And, reluctantly and relatively rarely, I sometimes use Mac OS.


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Librepup 6.0.2.2
Friday, November 13th, 2015
20:28:59 GMT


As usual, I haven't been staying very up to date with most anything going on in the world. So, I didn't find this until today:

Librepup

And here's the Puppy Linux Discussion Forum thread about Librepup.

I haven't tried Librepup yet, but, wanted to point it out anyway, since I find this Pup particularly notable because I'm not sure if there's any other Puppy or Puppy-based distro (yet) which so strongly emphasizes exclusively free, libre, open source software.

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systemd - probably a bad thing
Thursday, March 19th, 2015
13:56:08 GMT


Here's an interesting thread I found on the Puppy Linux Discussion Forum:

Puppy Linux Discussion Forum - boycott systemd


Barry Kauler, the creator of Puppy Linux, doesn't like systemd either, according to this blog post from March 2013:

Barry's Blog - eudev, fork of udev


Addition, 3/22/2015, 6:14 PM: And also according to this more recent blog post from Nov. 14, 2014:

Barry's Blog - Alternatives to systemd

End of addition.


I'm still not a Linux expert, and I ought to pay more attention to news in general (not just Linux news)... so, until the past couple hours or so, I wasn't even aware of "systemd" and how bad it is reputed to be, and quite probably actually is, in my opinion.

"systemd" isn't used in Puppy Linux, so no wonder I mostly hadn't encountered stuff about it before.

Except I had recently run across this post on Tumblr, which I didn't understand at the time:

DevOps Reactions Tumblr - Watching systemd evolve


Anyway, even though I don't fully understand what "systemd" is and all the arguments for and against it, it seems like this is probably a pretty important issue, and thus worth spreading the news about.

I get the impression from what I've read that "systemd" might be a serious threat to free (as in freedom), libre, open source software.

I don't understand it well enough myself yet to write clearly about it, but, hopefully just pointing out that boycott systemd discussion thread will help raise awareness of the potential problems. That discussion thread is currently 14 pages long and contains a lot of interesting info and links.


And, for people who'd prefer non-technical information on this topic, here's another amusing Tumblr post about "systemd":

DevOps Reactions Tumblr - Systemd

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Basic Tips for Using TrueCrypt in Puppy Crypt 4.3
Friday, February 25th, 2011
19:44:44 GMT


Tips

Here are some brief notes on how to use TrueCrypt in the Puppy Crypt 4.3 variant of Puppy Linux. I'm guessing the info in this post probably works (or mostly works) with other types of Linux as well.

First of all, here's a great YouTube video I found that helped me - Install and use TrueCrypt Disk Encryption freeware on Ubuntu & other Linux Distros

That video is by Johnson Yip.


TrueCrypt in Linux looks almost just like TrueCrypt in Windows. The most noticeable difference (at least to me) at a glance is that instead a list of drive letters being shown in the main window, numbers in a column called "Slot" are shown instead.

I was initially baffled about how to even locate my encrypted file containers in the Select File window (since you can't just go to the C or D drive).

But, thanks in part to the above video, I wasn't baffled for long.

To mount an encrypted file container in TrueCrypt:

My TrueCrypt encrypted file containers were all created with TrueCrypt for Windows, and happily, they seem to work perfectly with TrueCrypt for Linux as well.

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